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an apostle's letters to the church
Autumn takes us to the New Testament books of Peter—two letters composed by Jesus' most memorable apostle.

1Peter, composed with the
help of an editor, was written to comfort and encourage Christ-followers after Emperor declared Christianity an illegal religion. His letter offers a counter-intuitive challenges to believers: "Rejoice that you participate in the sufferings of Christ." Peter claimed that they—and all followers of Jesus Christ—can rejoice because we have a great hope. Hope was the theme of Peter's message to suffering, persecuted Christ-followers.

2Peter was a response to growing controversies within the church; disagreements about Jesus' nature, arguments about how to balance faith and works. Theological disagreements were undermining Christian unity. As a result some believers were giving up church, no longer gathering together. Where his first letter focused on dangers from outside the church, Peter's second letter addresses dangers from inside; false teachers, bad theology, and vague faith.

Join us Sunday mornings at the
Northside Center as we study these letters from the apostle Peter to the church of Christ. Much in these 1st century letters deserve attention from 21st century Christians.


recent weekends with hope

Living Hope—9/25
podcast

Mysterious Woman of Revelation—9/18
podcast

Mysterious Women who Anointed Jesus—9/11
online video

Deborah, Leader of Israel—8/28
podcast

Prophet for Hire—8/14
podcast

Our Future by Faith—8/7
podcast

Abraham's Desperate Faith—7/31
podcast

Moses' Reckless Faith—7/24
podcast

Noah's Crazy, Saving Faith—7/17
podcast

History's First Murder Victim—7/10
podcast

Kidnapped by God—6/19/2022
podcast

Faith of a Prostitute—6/12/2022
podcast

He Is Risen!—4/17/2022
podcast

Social Justice / Voddie Bauchman
podcast

what Christians believe / autumn 2018

classic podcasts / timeless


sunday monologues conclude with Q&A
Traditionally called a sermon; usually signifying a one-way discourse. However, sermon can be a conversation. As was practiced in the earliest centuries of the church, Sunday sermons conclude with Q&A.